Charlotte Yonge is one of the most influential and important of Victorian women writers; but study of her work has been handicapped by a tendency to patronise both her and her writing, by the vast number of her publications and by a shortage of information about her professional career. Scholars have had to depend mainly on the work of her first biographer, a loyal disciple, a situation which has long been felt to be unsatisfactory. We hope that this edition of her correspondence will provide for the first time a substantial foundation of facts for the study of her fiction, her historical and educational writing and her journalism, and help to illuminate her biography and also her significance in the cultural and religious history of the Victorian age.


Featured Letters...

Elderfield Otterbourne
July 12th 1898

Dear Mr Macmillan I am asking Mr Medley (The Rev John Medley Tyntesfield, Bristol) to write to you direct about his Grandfather’s drawing. It is rather a question what he may feel able to do, as it does not belong to him but to his cousin. It is in a book, but whether only fastened in, or bound up I cannot tell

I have told him that in either case, book or drawing would be ... continue reading

Feb 9th [after 1853]

Madam

I am obliged by your MS, but Alexandrine des Escherolles has been already translated.

Yours truly C M Yonge

... continue reading
Otterbourne, Winchester.
Feb 21st [1862 ]
My dear Sir John, I asked Milly to thank you and tell you that I was taking time to ponder over your kind suggestion about old Lauderdale’s remains – and I think I should like to transfer the sight of the book to Dr May, who shall tell Leonard of it. I had already made his son in law Hector a Dorsetshire Squire, so that he would bring the Doctor to Portland and introduce him to ... continue reading
Elderfield
April 13th 1896

My dear Mr Moor Mr Reynolds has just been here about Annie Norgate. I shall be most thankful to you for helping her, and shall gladly join in the £10.10 subscription for her

Yours sincerely C M Yonge

Mr Davies writes to

... continue reading