Letters 1 to 41 out of 41

I quite agree with you as to the promise of power in Aunt Judy’s doings . . . tell her that I shall like to have her intended story. I like to hear that you are about one of the Aunt Judy race too, but really between Aunt Judy herself and you as Aunt Judy, it is not easy to distinguish in one’s letters which one means, though there is no such difficulty in the ... continue reading

[To a daughter of the Rev. W. J. Butler.]

A sort of notion of locating a story at Market Stoneborough had made us look up the Mays and find out what they are doing now.

Blanche and Hector are just married, and Aubrey, having proved too delicate for Eton, is Ethel’s faithful pupil still, and Flora’s house is very well managed, but so stupid, and Mary is married to a clergyman.

I have changed the cart accident into ... continue reading

Otterbourne/Winchester
Jany 10th 1861

My dear Mrs Blackburn, I was very glad of a letter from you, it is so pleasant to keep up our intercourse that I am always wishing to invent some cause for writing. I wonder if I shall ever arrive at writing the Siege of Waspburg, it is a thing I cannot do till the spirit of wasps seizes me and I suppose it will do some time or other. Your birds must be delightful, except ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Feb 6th 1861

Madam, I have looked at and considered your version of the first Book of the Iliad, and it seems to me very prettily done, but I am afraid that in the present state of criticism especially through Mr Gladstone’s book, even Homer for children would require something more and deeper some separation of the Greek and Roman names of the deities, and view either mythical or historical, making it more of a study and not taking ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Feb 7th 1861

My dear Miss Warren,

Many, many thanks for the extracts. I was waiting to write and thank you for them till a few pressing letters were put out of the way - indeed I dont [sic] believe I thanked you intelligently for the first set, I mean not after I had really studied it. Henerety I believe to be meant for Henrietta here who was generally so called. Another they have given up in despair and ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
16th Febry 1861

My dear Miss Bourne,

If you ask what business have I to write, I can only answer that I do so out of the abundance of my heart which wants to speak out on great and little matters.

We wish you would, or let Charlotte make a P.S. to the review of My Life, out of your letter, it says so many things that have not been said, and should be said on that endless subject – ... continue reading

Otterbourne,Winchester.
Febry 18th 1861

My dear Miss Sewell

Many thanks for you kind & pleasant piece of intelligence. I shall certainly try to get a sight of the number of Blackwood, it is rather an antidote to the Morning post which kindly says that no young people read my books, though their Mammas wish them to do so, because they are so unnatural.[[footnote:1]

A good journey to you, I hope you will discover the En[or u]ilian provinces, which was one of ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester
Febry 19th 1861

My dear Miss Bourne

Mamma’s letter to you was a surprise to me when she shewed it to me, and I did not answer it till we had heard from you again, in hopes we might see you. The matter with Winchester is overbuilding - the Itchen supplied all drainage while the place was of moderate size, but it is now too big for that, and the dear Warden, Dr Moberly and the Cathedral people have ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Febry 23d 1861

My dear Miss Bourne,

I believe I sent you a queer incoherent note yesterday, but we were so glad to find the hospital taken up in that quarter that there was an immediate impulse of writing, not very rationally carried out I suspect. Now after seeing your note to M A D I will begin with Ploughing and Sowing about which I thought I had told you long ago. 'My Life' does not write from it, ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Feb 26th 1861

Dear Cobweb

I did not answer you at once because the Glowworm sent me a set of questions by the same post, and I had to refer to the Secretary to know which was to have the first turn. She decides that, as by some blunder the Glow Worm stepped into Fru Astrida’s place, and that her questions had therefore better have the first turn. I believe this is rather a good thing for your first ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 2nd 1861

My dear Miss Smith

I did not write yesterday because the parcel was not come, but it is here all safe this morning though I can only testify to the beautiful clear MS as yet. It was rather over weight, which perhaps was the reason of the delay. I think it is possible this may account for the lamented loss of the Wynnes, as the post will not convey things beyond a certain amount overweight. I ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 5th 1861

My dear Miss Smith

Thanks many - not that I meant to be paid when I mentioned it only to avoid the loss of MSS - I shall be very glad to have them as they are ready, and if you write with them, I will not answer without occasion. I believe an odd number of stamps is always wrong - but 4 will carry almost anything one wants to send. You are right that one ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 6th 1861

My dear Miss Smith,

I send the papers about Sandwell, and a back number of the M P, which please return. I have scarcely heard anything about the institution since I received this account from Miss Goodrich so my knowledge of it is two years old

yours sincerely

C M Yonge

... continue reading
Otterbourne, Winchester
March 14th 1861

My dear Miss Smith I am sure it is due that you should have the reading of this letter and the administration of the £10 as you must know much better how to reach the destitute families than I do, and the donor will I am sure be well pleased to hear it is in the hands of Frances Dysart’s author. If you will be so kind as to undertake it, I will write to her ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 18th 1861

My dear Miss Smith,

I think your answer is a very wise one, and quite what I can understand. I am sure with all the poor I have known unusual help unless on some very pressing occasion would be anything but really beneficial, but the three old couples might be most happily provided, and I hope Mrs Elphinstone may choose that way of spending the sum. I will put what you say before her, thank you ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 18th 1861

Most submissive Cobweb,

The only change that I would suggest this time would be that for the word Evangelists you should substitute Gospels – as the Forms to which you refer rather symbolize the characteristics of the Gospels themselves than of their writers The answers will carry you all very deep and high.

The Humble Bee will be delighted with Kepler as the stars are her peculiar line. We shall have such beautiful stories of Handel that ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
March 26th 1861

My dear Miss Smith

I have all but finished Mrs Grant and most interesting she is. Many many thanks for her. I am not sure whether she is not a little too long, to be in thorough proportion with the others, and if I find it so, perhaps I may have to take out a few of the letters that relate less directly to her personal history, but certainly not the American ones. What an old ... continue reading

Otterbourne,Winchester.
April 22nd 1861

My dear Miss Wilford

Yesterday was the Ampfield anniversary of the consecration of the Church and I took a grand holiday - including a walk from Ampfield to Hursley with Mr Keble, and so I could not write but we have read your Seven Campbells and like them very much. I suspect boys would believe in them more if John Lackland always went by his English name.

I do not think a Scottish minister stands on the ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
May 9th 1861

My dear Miss Warren,

The Lecture has not yet found its way to me, but I hope it soon will. I know there is no reason for mistrusting the post in such cases as a family party generally takes a good while in all sucking the marrow of anything of the sort, especially if it be in M S, and as I do not think we are likely to be interrupted for a long time there ... continue reading

Whit Monday [19 May] 1861

My dear Fanny

Our hearts have been very full of you for many a day past, though somehow I durst not write, perhaps from very reverence of your waiting state. But now this precious Whitsuntide arrival gives me a right to write at once, for I am sure you ought to have the first sight of every word from or of your glorious Brother at such a moment, and though no doubt your hands are full ... continue reading

My dear John, Many thanks for your kind answer. I suspected it must be so from the numerous examples abroad in the world, but I did not venture to act without being sure of the etiquettes. I was very glad of your account of our dear Mrs Dyson and I am sure you would have been satisfied of our opinion as to the treatment had you heard us rejoicing with Miss Sturges Bourne that her illness ... continue reading

My dear Mrs Merriman, Mrs Collins will be thankful to have the time till August to get Anne’s clothes ready, and give her the final instructions in scrubbing &c She is quite satisfied with the terms, and has no doubt of her daughter’s strength, Anne has been in great anxiety for the answer, she wishes so much to be with her friend Mary. I do not think you will find her fail on the side ... continue reading

Otterbourne,Winchester.
June 10th 1861

Dear Sir,

I am much obliged by the little book that I received on Saturday, which seems to me very interesting.

My tale of the Young Stepmother is ready to be begun upon whenever you like to have it sent up - unless you think it better to wait till later in the year.

So much has been said in the Saturday Review lately about the want of a history of Christian names that I think it may ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
June 21st 1861

Dear Madam,

I am very grateful for your kind extracts from your Register which will be very useful to me - Avis or Avice - the same as Havois or Hedwig is less uncommon than one at first imagines. I knew a servant so called and a child who had it by inheritance from her grandmother & I have found it often in an old register in the N of Hants. Wilmot too is often in ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
June 26th 1861

My dear Miss Smith,

I send you an order for the chapters of the Thorne that have appeared- also another to correct. I think people like it much - your neighbour Miss Wilford was talking about it yesterday she is staying with her aunt at St Cross, and I am always much tempted to betray you

yours sincerely

C M Yonge

The Order is payable to Ann Smith - more names always cause blunders

... continue reading
July 1st 1861

My dear Mrs Bliss,

I did not think when last I saw you that the accompanying book would have come so soon, so I said nothing about it, but if you would be so kind as to take charge of it, I should be very much obliged as it is a parcel that will not well travel by post. The letters I think I shall have to send by post

yours sincerely

C M Yonge

... continue reading
Otterbourne, Winchester.
July 3d 1861

My dear Miss Smith

I have sent my brother to torment the Winchester postmaster, so I hope it will all come right. I sent another at the same time to Old Charlton to Mrs Carr, which perhaps made this confusion. Perhaps I should have told you that I made out the order in the name only of Ann Smith. How happy you must be with your sailor - it seems like all the holidays of many ... continue reading

My dear Fanny,

I thought it might be more comfortable to you not to hear from me till the great stress of letters was over at first, and so that I would wait to write till I could send the precious letters. We took our turn the last, and so read them upon Friday, the very day one would have chosen above all others for it, the girding to the battle in that calm and self-devoted ... continue reading

[September 1861]

My mother and I are much obliged for your kind letter. Our route to Thirsk lies direct from London, and we are due there on Friday, staying there about a fortnight or so--but afterwards we have to get across to Gloucestershire, and Sheffield is so temptingly on the way, that if you are likely to have room for us, we should much like to sleep a night at Ecclesfield, in the last of September, as ... continue reading

My dear Mr Coxe, If you have become a DD you must excuse me just as you had to do about the omission of your final e for which Mr Wither scolded me. As I never hear him call [you] anything but Coxe I have nothing to go upon.

When we were going to Oxford before, he gave me a message from you that you would be so kind as to look out for me the ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Nov 8th 1861

My dear Miss Smith

I found your MS here yesterday on my return from a two months expedition into Yorkshire and Devonshire. I think it is a pretty bright description, and the history of the contending organs is very entertaining, the only pity is that it is too late for December. I hope you have had a chapter of the Thorne. I find it is much liked and I am glad to see you in the ... continue reading

How can I grieve and sorrow about my dear dear Father’s blessed end? . . . I shall like the photograph of Hursley Vicarage and Church, the lawn and group upon it. But most shall I like to think that Mr. Keble, and I dare say Dr. Moberly too, pray for me and this Mission. I need the prayers of all good people indeed.

... continue reading

My dear Irene

No wonder the poet was puzzled! It is a very comical adventure in the annals of Goosedom! I agree with Mrs Martyn in thinking your first question excellent, and your second is very good, but No. 3 seemed to me too big a question. Only think how much there is to say about a county, even if you gave but one line to each event that happened! I was asked to write a ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Novr 21st 1861

My dear Miss Smith,

You must have begun to wonder if the Indian £10 was coming I am sure I did, but here it is at last, in good time I hope. It seems that Mrs Elphinstone has been very ill, and that has prevented her from sending it sooner. I will write to her to acknowledge it as soon as I have heard from you. I am glad to see your three Ks in the ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester
Novr 22nd [1861]

My dear Irene

I like this form of the question much, and think it suggestive. The County History would do for a historical question but would make too much history coupled with another. I am not sure however whether you have not too many pairs of qualities, and if it might not be better to leave out contemn & despise, and perhaps hope & anticipate, the distinction in the first place being too small, in the ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester
Novr 23d 1861

My dear Miss Smith

I have not the letter, at least I do not believe I have but I am almost certain that it was to be the 4 couples at 2lb; and I think you may safely so apply it. I will wait a week to write to Mrs Elphinstone in case you should be able to tell me anything specially about any of the people.

I do not know whether I forgot to finish my ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Novr 25th 1861

My dear Henry. To begin with domestic intelligence. You and your kind wife will, I am sure be glad to hear that a very fine little boy made his appearance here on Saturday evening - one day less than 13 months younger than his sister; who has not quite decided whether he is a doll or not.

Next, I shall be very glad of the prospectus &c that you propose to send, for I want details of ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester.
Decr 10th 1861

Dear Mr Henderson ,

Pray take your own time in making the addition to the paper on Folk Lore, it will not be able to appear in the January no. and indeed I fear I may have to divide it, as 45pp is rather a large allowance out of 112 for one subject, and it will answer better to cut it in two. I am glad to hear of the further additions.

Many thanks ... continue reading

Otterbourn
St Stephen [26 December 1861]

My dear Cobweb,

Many thanks for your share of the photograph book, which is a very pleasant possession though my view of your self was so fleeting that I am no judge of the likeness- I was in hopes of being able to send a photograph of myself to all my faithful brood, but the man at Plymouth after keeping us waiting for two months for some copies, announced that the negative was broken. There had ... continue reading

Otterbourn
Decr 30th [1861]

My dear Cobweb,

I am glad to tell you that no one has passed you, though Firefly is your equal, in the number of votes, and I therefore should like to know which of Mother Goose’s works you would like best to have- only do not expect it immediately as I should like to have it bound for you.

Thank you for letting me see the photograph I am glad you have got it as it is ... continue reading

Otterbourne, Winchester
Decr 31st [1861]

My dear Irene

I send back the translation with many thanks for the sight of it. I was very sorry to see by the paper that the sorrow you feared has come, and that the year is closing on you in sorrow and mourning, perhaps of a kind that one feels doubly, through one’s parents as well as oneself. I do not know whether you are feeling able to care for these Gosling matters now but ... continue reading